Available field grown landscape plants

 

Paperbark Maple

Paperbark Maple Acer Griseum 'Paperbark Maple'

Paperbark maple is an outstanding specimen tree for the small to medium sized garden. As the name implies, it has one of the finest exfoliating barks in the plant kingdom, a deep rich cinnamon brown in color, and flaking in even young plants. The leaves are trifoliate, a medium green in spring and summer, but turning red and yellow for fall coloration. The 30� x 20� canopy can be used wherever a small tree can be placed, but site this one as a specimen where it can be constantly appreciated. Maples prefer a moist but not wet site with deep acidic soils, and will perform best in sun or light shade. Paperbark maple combines grace and elegance with multi-season interest, and expresses the highest refinement available in woody plants, but it is almost impossible to propagate, very slow to grow, and rarely available.

 

 

 

Gracilis Hinoki Cypress

Gracilis Hinkoi Cypress Chamaecyparis Obtusa 'Gracilis'

Here’s a rather fast growing (12-16” per year when established) Hinoki  that will grow to an irregular upright pyramid of 20’ height in time.  It is well furnished with glossy deep green short fans of foliage, giving a lacy appearance.  Performing at its best in zones 5-8, ‘Gracilis” will make a specimen or tall hedge of decidedly oriental flavor.  It will serve as an excellent
Backdrop plant for the enclosed and private Japanese garden.

 

 

 

 

Green Arrow Alaskan Cedar

Green Arrow Chamaecyparis Nootkatensis 'Green Arrow'

This form of Alaskan yellow cedar is one of the world’s most beautiful weeping plants. The foliage drapes like the finest cloth from its pendulous branches, which are upturned at the tips.  This plant needs at least five years of growth before its remarkable character is revealed.  It will ascend at about an 8-12” annual growth rate when established.  This exceedingly spectacular plant is only now being recognized.   It likes high humidity, and is adaptable to the east coast from Boston to Charlotte.  The final height is about 50’.

 

 

 

 

Weepping Alaskan Cedar

Weeping Alaskan Cedar Chamaecyparis Nootkatensis 'Pendula'

Rated by Krussmann as “one of the best weeping conifers for a specimen plant,” the weeping
Alaskan yellow cedar is an upright grower to 50’.  The needles are slightly grey-green in color, with a strong and graceful pendulous habit that is sure to delight.  Faster growing than ‘Green Arrow’, it is of similar garden culture.  Without a doubt, this is an absolutely beautiful plant.

 

 

 

 

Giokumo Japanese Cedar

Giokumo Japanese Cedar Cryptomeria Japonica 'Giokumo'

This appealing variety of Japanese cedar will grow wider than tall and attains 4-5’ in height.  Its bright green needles are ½” long, densely furnishing the stems with a full appearance.  The plant will have a coppery winter color in exposed situations, but will be greener in the shade.  It has a definite preference for a moist (but not wet) site, and is tolerant of all sorts of soils, including the sticky, orange-red brickyard clay of the southeast US.

 

 

 

 

Hikari Japanese Needle Juniper

Hikari Japanese Needle Juniper Juniperus Rigida 'Hikari'

Rated by Krussmann as “one of the best weeping conifers for a specimen plant,” the weeping
Alaskan yellow cedar is an upright grower to 50’.  The needles are slightly grey-green in color, with a strong and graceful pendulous habit that is sure to delight.  Faster growing than ‘Green Arrow’, it is of similar garden culture.  Without a doubt, this is an absolutely beautiful plant.

 

 

 

 

Weepin White Pine

Weeping White Pine Pinus Strobus'Pendula'

The weeping white pine is a classy, distinguished specimen plant to be sited by itself in full sun.  It requires staking to attain its erect habit, and then can be allowed to spread and cascade to its final form.  The needles are blue-green, born in bundles of 5, and fully clothe the plant to the ground.  The plant can be pruned to reveal the power of its grey trunk.  Cones are borne freely at a young age.  White pines require well-drained soil, and perform well from the Canadian border to the North Carolina piedmont, maybe even further south with knowledgeable guidance.

 

 

 

 

Filicoides American Arborvitae

Fern Leaf American Arborvitae Thuja Occidentalis 'Filicoides'

This is a nice, tight arborvitae growing to 18’ in height, and about 4-5’ wide at the base.  The leaves are in flattened sprays, with a slight twist (thus, fern leaf), bright green with good winter color.  It is hardy to USDA zones 3-8, prefers full sun, and is very adaptable as to soils and moisture, but does best with ample rainfall.  It can be a great plant for a hedge, as a specimen in a lawn situation, or in groups of 3.

 

 

 

 

Filiformis American Arborvitae

Thread Leaf American Arborvitae Thuja Occidentalis 'Filiformis'

One might consider this a green version of an old English sheepdog.  It has abundant green string-like foliage on an irregularly pyramidal form, and grows to a height of about 15’ in final size.  It will adopt a bronzy winter color in exposed situations, but remains greener in light shade.  It is most comfortable in a moist site, grows quickly, and is quite rewarding, even for the beginner.

 

 

Wyansdyke Silver American Aborvitae

Wyansdyke Silver American Arborvitae Thuja Occidentalis 'Wyansdyke Silver'

First found in his classic English nursery by conifer author and guru Humphrey Welch, this native American arborvitae variety has a strongly speckled white and green variegation all year, but is suffused with purple tints during the winter.  It is compact to about 6-8’ in height, is fast growing, and will make a distinctive garden background or wall for your favorite garden room-to-be.

 

 

 

 

Hondai Elkhorn Cedar

Hondai Elkhorn Cedar Thujopsis Dolbrata 'Hondai'

This plant begins life as a dwarf for at least 5 years, then forms a single leader and can eventually climb to a height of 60’.  The leaves are olive to yellow-green, extremely glossy, and feature prominent buds.  It is very tropical looking, but hardy to our temperate zones with good soil moisture.  It is of singular character, and appears very substantial in the landscape, with strong horizontal branches and a rather narrow pyramidal profile. ‘Hondai’ is best sited as an individual specimen plant.  It hails from the mountains of northern and central Japan, and will grow in zones 6-8/9.